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As always, if you have questions, objections, worries or praise, and especially if you found your picture and want it removed, feel free to contact me. I will get back to you as soon as possible. You can also read my full disclaimer, if you are interested.

 

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

@ Lilly Schwartz 2013

© Lilly Schwartz 2013

All pictures taken with: Olympus Pen E-PL3 and Panasonic Lumix 20mm f/1.7 ASPH.

For anyone who might have missed my last post on my old blog experiments in experience: I have a new self-hosted blog and therefore the old one will not be updated anymore. For a while I was updating the both of them, but it just became too much of a headache and source of confusion. So, if any of you subscribers are wondering why they are getting updates from me, well, you subscribed to my work earlier at experiments in experience. Apart from the new name and address nothing has changed! After this little prelude, let me continue with my usual ramblings …

After a few days in Berlin we travelled again to Chemnitz. Of course I am so behind with editing my digital pictures that these pictures are actually from before my last trip here. In my defence, I’ve been very busy developing and scanning the film that I shot during that last trip. After all I shot 9 rolls and my scanner can only do 6 negatives in one go. Believe me, I spent hours and hours processing all that film. Now there is only one more roll to go. That one is still waiting for a developing tank companion though, since it’s way more efficient to develop two rolls at once. My current favourite recipe for developing at box speed is: 3.5ml Rodinal 1:100, quick inversions for 30sec, 60 min stand, one inversion at the halfway point. A new thing I learned with all this scanning is: Although underexposed shots can be saved by scanning them properly, it’s way more efficient to expose them properly. Then the automatic detection works and my Epson scanning software does all the work of selecting the frames, which reduces the effort to inserting the negatives into the holder. And another hint: If you get coloured streaking in your scan, take a lamp and search the glass of your scanner for dust specks. They can interfere with the calibration and therefore cause the streaking.

Now that I’m done with all the processing, it’s time for another couple of shooting sessions here in Chemnitz. There are still 2 places I want to document for my Memory project. Although I’m busy with my analog project I still need to make it a habit again to edit pictures daily. I have reached a point where my hard drive is full just because I am about a month behind on my editing! It’s about time that I do something about it.

Comments

  • Hi, i find N°1 is a very strong picture because you captured very well the expressions on the faces of the two gentlemen. For the same reason I like the fourth photo, the couple and the other lady have an interesting body language. Good series, well done thanks for posting.
    Making an habit of developing, editing, scanning, selecting and other related activities is sometimes hard but for sure will give benefits in the future! But I know, not so easy as saying it, my experience as well 🙂
    robert
    PS: never tried stan development, you make me desire to try it, sometimes!

    • Lilly Schwartz

      Thanks Robert 🙂 I used to do the editing every day and it really trains the eye. Somehow I lost the habit though and I need to really get it going again.

      You should try stand development. Good results and it’s hassle free. You don’t even need to measure the temperature or take care with the time … ten minutes or a couple of degrees more don’t really ruin anything (10°C more or less might be a problem though 😉 ).

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