night watch

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Today I shot my last roll of Velvia 100 in the Mamiya. This means that I’ve now shot 10 rolls of 120 slide film and I only need to shoot 2 more rolls to be all set for the litre of E6 chemicals I’ve been eager to test. However, I’ll wait with it until I’m finally finished with all my rolls from Argentina, since I don’t want to get distracted now that I finally have ironed out all the kinks in my C41 development process. I’ve already developed another 5 rolls today and hope to get through this litre of C41 chemicals a little quicker this time with 20 rolls put through them. Today the postman also brought some other stuff for experiments: A 100ft roll of Argenti Reporter 400 Plus which is supposedly Orwo N74+ and a bottle of HC-110. I’ve been meaning to get some HC-110 for a while to try out the third developer commonly used for stand-development, but I also want to try how it behaves in combination with the Jobo CPE-2. All of this after I finish with the rolls from Argentina though.

And just as I promised, today I show you the final roll from my last trip.

All pictures taken with: Leica M6, Zeiss ZM C-Biogon 35mm f/2.8.
Cinestill 800T @1600 developed in Fuji Hunt C41 Kit, no push.

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

© Lilly Schwartz 2015

Comments

  • Julia McClelland

    Even though they are coloured I love your night shots, in fact these are better suited to colour anyway. So, you have used the Mamiya again.

    • I’m so glad you like them! I also think that these work better in colour! I’m looking forward to doing some night shots with the Mamiya too, although that will probably mean adding a tripod to an already heavy camera! Should be fun though!

  • The mystic of the nightlight. Like it very much

    • Thank you Burkhard! I’m glad you like them! There is nothing quite like available light shots at night when you have the right film to play with! I’m looking forward to taking more of these!

  • gleamsss

    I absolutely love this collection of photos. Just tremendous. I’m interested to know more about your workflow on these… So you were a stop under… Were all shots taken wide open? How long of exposures? How were exposures determined? Thanks so much!

    • Thank you so much for your kind words!
      There are two good things about Cinestill: it’s tungsten balanced and it’s fast with very little grain when exposed correctly. This means that you need neither tripod nor colour correction filters for it at night (unless you are a perfectionist with a colour meter) and you can shoot in low light even at f/2.8, at least with a rangefinder. Most of these were probably shot wide open because f/2.8 is really pushing the limits even at ISO 1600. Exposures were between 1/8 to 1/30. I metered with the internal light meter of the M6, which is centre-weighted, taking the lightest area for reference. At night this kind of metering is obviously not reliable, so some shots probably ended up being at ISO 800, others at ISO 3200. At ISO 3200 the film is too grainy, but most of the shots seemed to fall into ISO 800-1600 when metering normally. In comparison to tediously working with a tripod and long exposures, figuring out reciprocity failure and filtering for both colour shifts and the tungsten lighting, it was really a rather simple snap and go affair.

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